UNCF Black History Month Luncheon

TAMPA – More than 270 guests attended the United Negro College Fund Black History Month luncheon Tuesday, Feb. 20 featuring civil rights activist and former U.N. Ambassador Andrew Young as the keynote speaker.

Young talked about the importance of the UNCF family for minority students. He also discussed how school helped him build character and diplomacy skills.

“Some people ask me where I learned diplomacy. I tell them I learned it in third grade. I wasn’t the best student, but I had to learn how to keep my lunch money from being taken. You learn from every experience.”

UNCFBlackHistoryUNCF Tampa leaders also presented NFL Hall of Famer and former Tampa Bay Buccaneer Derrick Brooks with a Champion of Education Award. Brooks spoke about his dedication to education and being a “community servant.” He encouraged attendees to ask themselves if their attitude was contagious, would it be worth catching.

Brooks was also recognized by AT&T as one of seven local leaders who has made an impact in Tampa Bay. During Black History Month, AT&T is sharing “History by Us,” stories highlighting African-American figures who may be lesser known but are still monumentally impactful.

AT&T has produced an African-American heritage calendar highlighting black leaders in Florida, with seven coming from the Tampa Bay area. Besides Brooks, AT&T recognized Arthenia Joyner, a Tampa attorney who served in the Florida Legislature for 16 years; Joseph and Norma Robinson, founders of The Sulphur Springs Museum and Heritage Center Museum; Dr. Paulette Walker, former director of undergraduate programs and internships at the University of South Florida’s College of Education and the 25th national president of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority Inc.; Rev. Watson Haynes, president and CEO of the Pinellas County Urban League and Terri Lipsey-Scott, executive director of  the Dr. Carter G. Woodson African-American Museum.

scroll to top