‘This is not justice:’ Freddie Gray’s grieving family lead calls for peace in Baltimore

Freddie Gray’s family has publicly denounced the riots in Baltimore which broke out just hours after his funeral.

Gray, who suffered a fatal spinal injury in police custody, was laid to rest on Monday morning.

By 7pm, a state of emergency had been declared in the Maryland city as mobs looted stores and set buildings alight to avenge Gray’s death.

However, Carron Morgan, Gray’s cousin, slammed the destruction and called for peace.

He told the Baltimore Sun: ‘This is not justice. This is just people finding a way to steal stuff.

‘We didn’t even want people to protest today. It was just a time to grieve for Freddie and to celebrate his life.’

He added that they will not be on the streets tonight, adding: ‘We’re going to be out tomorrow cleaning up, for sure.’

His words were echoed by Gray’s twin sister Fredericka, who spoke at a press conference shortly before midnight on Monday.

‘I don’t think it’s for Freddie,’ she said.

‘Freddie Gray wasn’t the type of person to break into stores and stuff.’

Bill Murphy, the family’s attorney, branded the situation ‘devastating’, adding: ‘This won’t solve the police problem. This is dangerous to the movement.’

Mary Koch, another attorney for the Gray family, said it was ‘terrible’ that riots had overshadowed the 25-year-old’s memorial service on Monday.

However, the protesters found support in Erica Garner, daughter of Eric Garner who died while being restrained by police in New York’s Statten Island.

Garner’s death sparked outrage that courted international attention, and weeks of protests – but they were incredibly tame in contrast with the scenes in Baltimore on Monday night.

Speaking to CNN’s Don Lemon, hours after she attended Gray’s funeral in Baltimore, Erica said she does not condone violence but understands the rioters’ frustration.

‘They had enough,’ she said.

‘They don’t know what else to do. They don’t have no [sic] jobs, they don’t have proper schooling. These kids have no hope. I’m not condoning what they are doing but they think “eventually this is going to happen to me, I’m going to be killed by police”, so they’re making themselves heard.

‘Burning down the city is not right but what other choice do we have. We’re scared.’

Source: The DailyMail

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