Kneeling is not disrespecting honorable service people

 

Dear Editor:

The National Anthem and American flag are the long-honored patriotic symbols of liberty and freedom for all people. All Americans understand that countless brave men and women have and continue to serve the United States of America militarily, always protecting these freedoms. By kneeling, this honorable service is not being questioned or disrespected, and never will be.

We Americans are better than that. Politicians and others purposefully injecting an anti-military rhetoric are shameful and choose to not recognize the real message the peaceful kneeling protest is conveying.

Kneeling during the National Anthem has never been about disrespecting honorable service people, what they sacrificed and fought for, or disrespecting the flag. In fact, if any American feels that there are racial injustices and/or racial inequities that they are subject to, it is the beauty of the American flag and National Anthem that serve as our reminder that we are all created equal and must be assured the promises spelled out in the U.S. Constitution (“We The People”).

Kneeling is a call-out to all fellow Americans — regardless of color, race or religion — to open our eyes and hearts and understand that something may not be right with an American community, something that needs correcting now.

We can’t let negative political rhetoric divide us, especially with those wanting to make this an anti-military story. That is wrong. Keep the narrative where it belongs: some people quietly and respectfully kneeling as the words of liberty and freedoms are being sung, accompanied by the America flag…a simple call to invite us all to come together as patriotic Americans, advocating together for equal justice for all people.

If liberties and freedoms are being denied to some, we as Americans come together to make the wrongs right. We as a unified America will then know that no American feels left out from enjoying un-encumbered liberty and justice.

Joining hands together is a beautiful way to honor our brave men and women, past and current military service people, who fought and served to gain and preserve these freedoms, liberty and justice for all.  Perhaps local, county, state and federal leaders can persuade the President of the United States of America to set the example for the greater good of all Americans.

Lastly, we may not always like certain public protests (e.g., Americans saluting the Nazi flag in Charlottesville). However, we as Americans must respect the mandate of the First Amendment to the United States Constitution.

Pledge Of Allegiance:

“I pledge allegiance to the Flag of the United States of America, and to the Republic for which it stands, one Nation under God, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all.”

The Star Spangled Banner:

Oh, say can you see by the dawn’s early light

What so proudly we hailed at the twilight’s last gleaming?

Whose broad stripes and bright stars thru the perilous fight,

O’er the ramparts we watched were so gallantly streaming?

And the rocket’s red glare, the bombs bursting in air,

Gave proof through the night that our flag was still there.

Oh, say does that Star – Spangled Banner yet wave

O’er the land of the free and the home of the brave?

First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution:

Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.

Yolanda Roman

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